Top skin care myths

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Myth 1: The skin care products that are labelled “Hypoallergenic” are meant for use of sensitive skin.

Fact: Word ‘Hypoallergenic’ has no scientific meaning and implication!

Reality : ‘Hypoallergenic’ is often advertised and labelled on certain skin care products which according to the manufacturers meant that the product is mild, can be used on sensitive skin and is less likely to cause any allergic reaction. But the fact of the matter is there are no methods, ingredients, restrictions, regulations and testing to prove anywhere in the world if the product is hypoallergenic or not. Its meaning has been developed only to contrive the consumers into buying their products

(sources to check: http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm167202.htm; and http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/labeling/claims/ucm2005203.htm)

Myth 2: High priced products have high-quality ingredients while inexpensive products have low quality ingredients.

Fact: all cosmetic companies use almost the same kind of cosmetic grade ingredients.

Reality: cosmetic companies have no proof about how the ingredients they are using are of high quality. The cosmetic ingredient manufacturing companies supply almost the same grades of cosmetic ingredients to various cosmetic product manufacturers which are all of high quality so how the acclaimed ‘high quality ingredients’ could be better than others making the product so expensive. It has more to do with the marketing rather than its ingredient quality.

(source: http://www.alternet.org/story/148140/the_cosmetics_racket%3A_why_the_beauty_industry_can_get_away_with_charging_a_fortune_for_makeup)

Myth 3: A special and unique formula created by a famous scientist (doctor, dermatologist, chemist or whatsoever) having some secret ingredients, has now been made available for public use.

Fact: there is no secret formula or ingredient. Cosmetics have standard cosmetic ingredients nothing else!

Reality: The brands are masters at making their cosmetic products sound like some extraordinary products that are capable of doing miracles. But in reality, whatever skin care products are created, they all have standard cosmetic ingredients. They are not allowed to contain any ingredient like that of drugs otherwise they will have to follow different regulations. Even the highly acclaimed ingredients like seaweed extracts, plants oils etc. costs in pennies to the cosmetic companies not for hundreds of pounds.

(sources: http://www.beaucience.co.uk/2015/09/creme-de-la-mer-face-cream-review.html
http://www.paulaschoice.com/beautypedia-skin-care-reviews/by-brand/la-mer/_/Creme-De-La-Mer
https://www.truthinaging.com/review/whats-in-creme-de-la-mer)

Myth 4: Our skin care products make use of natural organic ingredients because synthetic ingredients derived from gasoline or petroleum based products are bad for skin.

Fact: even the synthetic ingredients used in the skin care products are derived from the natural ingredients and environment. So what’s unnatural in them?

Reality: there are no cosmetics to date which use ‘all natural ingredients’.  Every product uses one or some other kind of synthetic ingredient in its composition. There are numerous synthetic ingredients which are great for your skin. Petroleum and mineral oil by-products are derived from the natural resources and are absolutely organic in nature. There is nothing to support that their use of harmful to the skin in fact these has been recognized by the cosmetic chemists all across the globe as superior emollients and absolutely harmless (Source: Dermatologic Survey, June 1998, pages: 661-664).  The fact is it is absolutely safe to have any such ingredient in your skin care product especially if you have dry or sensitive skin.

(Check sources: International Journal of Cosmetic Science, December 2012, pages 511–518; Medycyna Pracy, Volume 62, 2011, pages 435–443; Journal of Dermatologic Science, May 2008, pages 135–142; International Journal of Cosmetic Science, October 2007, pages 385–390; European Journal of Opthalmology, March-April 2007, pages 151–159, Cosmetics & Toiletries, February 1998, pages 33–40)

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